Connecting Your Local Business 101


Connecting your new business location to the internet and other business applications takes some knowledge of the whos and hows.  It can take time to determine the best connectivity solution at the best price for your business needs.



Marketplace News Author:  Mary Stanhope, Vice President Marketing

Connecting your new business location to the internet and other business applications takes some knowledge of the whos and hows. It can take time to determine the best connectivity solution at the best price for your business needs. 

So, where do you start? First, which service provider connects your location? What speeds at what price do they offer? And when can they turn on service? You need a way to have visibility into the connectivity for your business location. Unfortunately, this often takes more time than you would think. You can google options in your city, reach out to local incumbent providers, ask nearby businesses, all of which can take time and have a varying degree of accuracy for your specific address. As an option, look to leverage an online marketplace that will provide simple design, quote and ordering options for your location. Check for Global Capacity Business Services at your address.

The next consideration to make when connecting your business location involves your specific business needs. The speed and type of network connectivity you select will differ, for instance, if you are using streaming video or data backup in addition to simple broadband internet requirements. 

Connectivity Solutions that may meet your needs:

  • Business Ethernet - Ethernet is a good choice for businesses requiring more bandwidth for multimedia applications, remote connections, Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), and application hosting. 
  • Business T1 - T1 solutions are a fit for growing local businesses requiring nationwide availability and dedicated bandwidth. T1 also supports Voice Services and multiple Internet users.
  • DSL - A cost-effective solution, DSL is a good fit for businesses to run non-mission-critical applications, and generally requiring faster download than the upload speeds.

Now that you know how you are connecting, think about your internal network. When it comes to the network inside your office, your local area network (LAN) is typically comprised of two pieces of equipment: a switch and a router. Switches and routers are the building blocks for all business communications, from data to voice and video to wireless access. The switch connects multiple disparate devices, like computers, printers and point of sale devices, onto one single network. Switches enable these connected devices to communicate with one another. While, switches create a network, routers connect networks. A router links computers to the Internet, so your business can share a connection. Your router acts as a dispatcher, choosing the best path for information to travel so it's received quickly. As a best practice, avoid settling for home networking products as they are far less scalable and don't offer as robust functionality (i.e. video, integrated messaging). 

Getting a business location connected may seem like an overwhelming project, but it should not be harder than running your business.

Global Capacity is the leading connectivity as a service company that improves the efficiency and reduces the cost of data network services globally. No one provider has a ubiquitous footprint, through its innovative One Marketplace, Global Capacity brings together customers and suppliers through an automated platform that provides ubiquitous access network solutions that deliver on its brand promise of Connectivity Made Simple.


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